Eva’s Restaurant: Dining with No Distractions


Whether it’s updating a status, uploading a new picture, or tweeting, the average person seems to be inseparable from their smart phone.  Eva’s Restaurant on Beverly Hills Boulevard hopes to get rid of this constant updating by offering a 5% discount off the total dining bill if customers choose to leave their phones with the receptionist during the whole meal. Although this may sound drastic to some, Chef Mark Gold and his wife Alejandra Gold hope to rekindle personal relationships, an aspect that this era has slowly been shying away from.

Chef Gold states that he came up with this new idea after discussing how irritating it was to find customers constantly on their cell phones during dinner. So far the new policy has caused about 40% to 50% of customers to leave their phones at the receptionist and eat in peace. Gold states, “Eva’s is really about family and being at home. That’s what we want to exemplify.”

Unlike Eva’s, most restaurants encourage their customers to like them on Facebook or Twitter in order to promote their business over the social media. One report says that a restaurant in Washington DC, Rogue 24, originally prohibited the use of phones; however, six months later the restaurant reverted to its usual way with most customers sharing pictures on Instagram. For Eva’s Restaurant updating a new picture of a delicious new dish on Instagram is no longer an option.

While other restaurants have attempted to follow Eva’s footsteps, the social media has ultimately become so versatile that it is almost impossible for the average person to avoid it. This sort of impersonal relationship has found its way into the classroom with both teachers and students hiding behind their own computer screens. Although it may be difficult, classrooms are attempting to break down those technological walls and have open, interpersonal discussions. Even with technology consuming almost every part of today’s world, personal connections remain fundamental to creating real relationships. As a true advocate of personal relationships, Gold states, “We just want people to connect again.”